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>> it became a matter of economic security. u.s. demand for medical care as a social right, u.s. workers with movement represented this. they came to national prominence and the second bill of rights and finally, they were adopted when the united nations declaration of human rights was put in force after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the declaration after her husband's death. virtually every industrialized nation has taken a step to industrialize these rights and have some kind of health coverage for their citizens with some major exceptions are you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. tell us what you think about this programming this weekend. you can tweet us at apple tv and comment and send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> up next, "after words" with james hershberg and the international history project. we will have david coleman and his a list work, "the fourteenth day: jfk and the aftermath of the cuban missile crisis." he is the director of the miller center and he details the what
. it was the lingering sense can he pull a fast one. it wasn't a u.s. official. in congress and american politics there were those on the right-wing who were saying, you know, this is our chance to get rid of this regime. how do we know they won't hide missiles in caves or something like that? so -- how did kennedy view khrushchev once he agreed to pull the miss thes out? did he begin to change the view with him someone >> guest: i'm not sure. i think it took awhile. we were talking before about verifying before trusting. trusting came gradually, again, once the surveillance flights were showing the soviets were following through. they were dismantling things. they started to realize, the sowf soviets and crew shove we can trust him. later on in the weeks later there are moments where trust really comes again. because the months we get -- once we get through the -- the end bookend of the missile crisis is traditionally the november 20th deal. >> host: the war teen ends. >> guest: the nature of the deal there are long-range bombers in cuba. there are three weeks of negotiation about are these or n
home, you pay an average of texas in the u.s. $160. in france you pay $38 u.s. annika worldwide calling to 70 countries come not just the u.s. and canada. worldwide television, not just domestic. 10 times faster downloading and your painless and 25 cents on the dollar. all this other countries under and the fundamental principle in the chronology rather the key to economic growth of industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along. it was interstate highway programs and airports that are crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. the rest of the world is getting the information is deeper highway. as literally told by the chief pr person at ricin that was the phrase i'm not really used anymore. assume the company actually has fiber-optic to your home. but the companies are not wired the whole country. universal access, really high-speed internet lead to a even imagine what they are. if you build it, they will come. we are going to be left in the dust economically. and then these companies but to the state legislat
have one in my home -- you pay on average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france, you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and ten times faster downloading, and you're paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand, fundamental principle in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century came along it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information super highway. and what does the industry say? don't call it that. the rest of the world -- >> did they literally say that. >> guest: i was told by the pr person at verizon that was not used anymore. that's the only company that actually has fiberoptic to your home. at&t has fiberoptic down the street but not to your home. but the companies are not wiring the w
and clinton administrations, i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years and times in israel. so it's a unique perspective looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> host: so, ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> guest: it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nation's that have the small majority in israel and our great country. and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies and islamic terrorism that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land. not just jews, but non-jews as well. so it's a qu
famously be -- trust but verify. u.s.-india cruise ship agreed to remove the missiles under u.n. inspection, castro refused to allow the inspection of any missile dismantling and removal from cuba. what were some of the complications that kennedy had to deal with, beginning on october 29 of this whole issue of inspections and of dealing with the soviet weapons and forces left over in cuba? >> guest: i think the context of this is important for them on october 18, 2 days after kennedy had been shown photographs of soviet missiles in cuba, the soviet foreign minister came into the oval office, kennedy asked him flat out, are you installing offensive nuclear weapons in cuba? and he said no. we are not doing this. unknown to him, kennedy had the lossy photos and so mr. kennedy, he had just been like to directly about the missile. so fast toward almost two weeks, he has this issue with the soviet premier has said we will remove the missiles. trust us, we'll do. for the members of the ex-con, the issue is not so much trust but verify, but verify first. there really wasn't a lot of trust the kenne
of the trouble they package and i find my home, you pay on average with taxes and you $160. in france, uk $388 u.s. and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries, not just the u.s. and canada. you get worldwide television, not just domestic. and your internet is 20 times faster is uploading and 10 times faster downloading, and your bank less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand a fundamental principle. in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as an desolation came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20 century came along, it was highways, interstate highway program, for example, an airport that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. and what distinguishes a? don't call it that anymore. the reason is the rest of was getting information superhighway -- >> host: to the delivery to you that? >> guest: [inaudible] at&t has fiber optic or not to your own prodigious runs down the street. but the companies are not wiring the whole country the way these other countries are. universal access
to the school how much we spend per year u.s. a private school and some of them, 25,000, 30,000, 40,000 a year u.s. get public school, some states it is five, 6,000 a year but most states especially the east coast is ten, 15,000, a cambridge massachusetts is $25,000 per student. what is your average class size and they will save between 20 and 30. okay. private school you are charging 30,000 a year, there's 20 students at $600,000 per classroom. it is essentially what is strictly impacting the students, the teacher, the classrooms and maybe the textbooks. all i can figure out as may be 100,000, 150,000 being spent where are the ever quarter of a million or $300,000 at any level? why can't we instead of private schooling for 10,000 year were 40,000, 10,000 a year its 300,000 a year. meek teaching -- a lot of people pulitzer office. teaching should be on par with doctors and engineers and lawyers. that is nice look service but if you believe that, treat teachers the same as doctors and lawyers that is the best signal to society that you actually value but the money is clearly there and then it will
to pay $38 get worldwide calling to 70 countries not just u.s. and canada, worldwide television not just domestic and the internet is 20 times faster uploading and downloading and you are paying less than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand a fundamental principal in the 19th century the canal and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrialization came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. as the 20th century can along it was highways, interstate highway program for example and airports that were crucial to economic growth that is the super highway and they don't call it that anymore. the rest of the world is getting information superhighway. >> host: people literally say that? >> guest: the chief person at verizon to read the was a phrase that isn't used any more and they have the fiber optics but not to your home. but the companies are not wiring the whole country the way these others are. universal access, high-speed internet would lead to products and services i can't even imagine what they are but if you build it they will come and s
in 1806 citing, one of the most exciting elections in u.s. history because jefferson -- from aaron burr. the idea of aaron burr as president, random think matters. if aaron burr becomes president it's hard to imagine -- but he doesn't and he doesn't because in large part people realize that aaron burris not summoned they want anywhere near the white house at jefferson becomes president and then jefferson, the question is how much does it matter? if you look at the jefferson administration historians are overwhelmingly, the most important event of the jefferson administration was the louisiana purchase. not surprising. if you double the size of the country peacefully and at almost no cost it's an enormous achievement for any president. any president would want that on their resume. so is jefferson a high-impact president? that is what i want to know. if jefferson is not there just louisiana purchase happen anyway? what you see is jefferson sent an emissary to france to buy the louisiana territory from france except he sent an emissary to buy bye-bye the city of new orleans from france. t
of the national park service has over 40 or 50,000 visitors every year. its high of on the hill and the u.s. capitol dome for the right it is really an amazing majestic view and it's open seven days a week, and the curator of the douglas contributed forward and this was important to me, too to make this book not just kind of -- to make active living histories of people that read the book if they've never been to the douglass house would say i want to go over there or if they haven't been there for a few years they can go back over and kind of revisit. >> he is the curator of the douglass house. >> he was the curator for many, many years. a very well-respected kind of a douglass community, and then dr. clifford who was the university archivist at the house contributed the foreword. john muller is the author of frederick douglass and washington, d.c. the line of anacostia. thank you very hatch. >> thank you. >> talks about the rise of the super rich the top .1% of the global population. and the impact they have in the world. the stock was hosted by politics and prose bookstore in washington,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11